Understanding the Tesla Model S Performance Motor

16 Th02, 2021
83 814 lượt xem

Join me for a deep dive into the details of the 18,000 RPM performance rear motor and drive unit from a 2015-2016 Tesla Model S P90D. This drive unit is similar to the one used in the 2017-2020 P100D. The video is divided into four sections showing: 1. The motor and gears. 2. The high-performance bearings. 3. The lubrication system. and 4. The cooling system.
CORRECTIONS:
Thank you to everyone for catching my errors. There are always errors ;)
1. The Nissan Leaf ring gear is held on with 8 bolts, not 6.
2. The fluid in this drive unit is Dexron 6 transmission fluid.
3. Induction motor rotors do not have poles, just the stator. The 60 slot stator has four poles.
4. Silicon Nitride is a ceramic material.
Timeline:
0:00 Start
0:10 Introduction
1:35 Gearbox housing
2:10 Video Section 1 - Gears and Motor Rotor
2:45 The giant differential ring gear with 16-bolts!
4:20 The giant differential case bearings
4:50 The differential case speed at 250 km/h (155 mph) = 1841 RPM
5:15 MUST SEE Comparing the Tesla differential to others from a Chevrolet Bolt EV and Nissan Leaf EV
5:40 A Chevrolet Bolt EV differential ring gear with 12-bolts.
6:10 A Nissan Leaf EV differential ring gear with 8-bolts!
7:30 The Counter Shaft (Jack Shaft) with 25 pinion gear teeth. 78/25 = 3.12:1 Gear ratio from countershaft to the differential case
8:50 The countershaft speed at 250 km/h (155 mph) = 5743 RPM
9:30 The motor shaft with 25 teeth drives 78 teeth on the countershaft for another gear reduction of 78/25 = 3.12:1
10:08 The motor shaft speed at 250 km/h (155 mph) = 17,919 RPM
11:20 See all three gears in the reduction gearbox with an overall gear reduction of (78/25) x (78/25) = 9.7344:1
12:05 MUST SEE The AC Induction Motor Rotor with 74 bars
13:25 Motor specifications for power, torque, and gear ratio
15:00 MUST SEE Ceramic Bearings (Silicon Nitride) on the rotor from the SKF Group (skf.com)
16:22 MUST SEE Close up view of silicon nitride bearing
18:20 The motor rotor speed sensor reluctor wheel (tone ring)
19:22 Must SEE The rotor installed on the drive gear and the functioning gearbox
20:18 Video Section 2 - Specialized Bearings
21:21 The 60 slot four-pole stator and housing
23:05 The oil pump and how it is overdriven by the differential ring gear 23/78 = 0.2948:1 gear ratio (3.339 times faster than the ring gear)
23:55 MUST SEE The function of the oil pump (it may surprise you)
26:27 Motor shaft bearing reference speed and limiting speeds
27:30 How to run bearings at higher speeds than their limiting speeds
29:54 Video Section 3 - Lubrication
30:25 Drain and fill plug locations
30:50 Gearbox vent and inverter vents
31:05 Sport model label
31:39 MUST SEE Four different sealed areas in the drive unit
32:46 Video Section 4 - Cooling System
33:30 MUST SEE The coolant inlet port and the two paths coolant takes
33:53 Up for rotor cooling and gearbox cooling
35:03 Down for stator and inverter cooling
36:05 Coolant from the rotor moves to the gearbox heat exchanger and the outlet port
37:25 Stator temperature sensors
38:10 Coolant from the stator to the inverter coolant passages
38:28 Stator coolant temperature sensor
38:35 MUST SEE Insulated-Gate Bi-Polar Transistor (IGBT) module coolant passages and flow through gearbox passages
40:34 Inverter coolant outlet temperature sensor
40:45 The gearbox oil-to-coolant heat exchanger
41:38 Coolant outlet port to coolant pump and on-board charger module under the back seat.
41:55 Drive unit cooling system summary
43:04 IGBT inverter modules installed and inverter cover
43:40 High voltage battery cable connections and low voltage connections at the inverter
44:35 Video summary
Join us for hybrid and electric vehicle training with two online courses and in a 5-day on-campus boot camp with Professor John D. Kelly. See www.weber.edu/evtraining for more information.
Weber State University (WSU) - Automotive Technology Department - Advanced Vehicles Lab. A technical description and demonstration of the Tesla P90D Rear Drive Unit (RDU).
We teach current vehicle technologies to our automotive students at Weber State University and online. For more information visit: www.weber.edu/automotive
This video was created and edited by Professor John D. Kelly at WSU. For a full biography, see www.weber.edu/automotive/J_Kelly.html
Visit my other youtube channel viworld.info to see the amazing NVH app for vibration diagnosis!
Please consider a donation to the Department of Automotive Technology at Weber State University here: advancement.weber.edu/Automotive

NHẬN XÉT
  • You guys have fantastic videos. I am sure you inspire lots of future mechanics and engineers.

    iamthemossiamthemoss25 phút trước
  • You always provide great presentations! Thank you for that. It is most common for high speed bearings to be lubricated by polyolester based synthetic oils. A typical example is Phillips 66 Syndustrial Turbine Oil. These type lubricants offer better viscosity characteristics, lower coefficient of friction, and higher film strength than mineral oil based lubricants making polyolester lubricants the primary choice for very high speed, high load applications. It is also important to note double reduction helical gears are not known for their super efficiency especially under high loads. Elimination of the reduction gear system would be a real advantage. Anyone can research the losses caused by gear systems with those losses being significant. The bother I have with this motor is the typical design where the magnet field from the stator is perpendicular to the axis of rotor. This also requires use of ferromagnetic material for the conduction of the magnet field through the long path across the rotor and the long path around the stator from one side to the opposite side of the motor. Use of ferromagnetic materials in motors always cause losses due to the well known losses caused by changing magnetic fields within ferromagnetic materials. Motor efficiency suffers substantial from this antiquated design seldom exceeding 85%. A much better design is a pancake style motor where the magnet field is parallel to the axis of rotation. This style of motor, using five phases, can achieve 99% efficiency due in part to the elimination of the ferromagnetic material because the magnetic path can be a very short distance from stator to rotor. This design appears in the simplest form as a stator disk adjacent to a rotor disk. To increase output, stators and rotors may be stacked up like a stack of pancakes. Another advantage is the very high torque produce by this style of motor because the rotor reactive force may be designed with a long distance from the axis of rotation by design increases in motor diameter. Further advantages occur due to the lack of ferromagnetic materials and those losses and long time constants can allow this pancake design to be optimize for any RPM range without the need of gear reduction. All in all, one can expect in such a drive system as shown in this wonderful video presentation to experience an increase in efficiency of possibly as much as 50% at full load and likely 25% at low load. The big question is, "why is this antique design still even used anywhere?" Old habits are difficult to break!

    zynzy4uzynzy4uGiờ trước
    • Awesome information, thank you!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto36 phút trước
  • Top-notch quality video, love the level of detail. The only thing I noticed is that you sometimes seem to mix up mph and kph. Maybe try to hold one standard mph or kph (preferably metric, but whatever works for you :). )

    MartMartGiờ trước
    • Great point! Old habits are hard to break, but I am working on it. Thanks for watching.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto36 phút trước
  • Well actually i see that the ceramic ball bearings have indirect cooling through the shaft they hold on.

    AthanasAthanas2 giờ trước
    • You are absolutely correct, I missed that

      WeberAutoWeberAuto35 phút trước
  • Usually the rotative part is called a rotor, could be inductive, or other, the other part is called the stator, sometimes we also can have inductive stator if the rotor is the powered part equippedd with a commutator and the coils, but that deppends of the purpose, however the both parts combined are the electrical motor.

    AthanasAthanas2 giờ trước
    • Thank you for the information and thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 giờ trước
  • This was fantastic, and having participating in high-speed machinery design I really enjoyed the presentation of the cooling path. Many thanks!

    Jari BackmanJari Backman2 giờ trước
    • Thank you very much!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 giờ trước
  • they should've just used a lower kV motor, would've solved everything

    LegendLengthLegendLength7 giờ trước
    • Solved what? I do not understand

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 giờ trước
  • Nice comprehensive and detailed job explaining of a complex Tesla drive unit. I have a new Model Y and Tesla doesn’t require a fluid change. But after watching your video, I would think after 100k miles I would need change the lubricant or various types of fluid? What is your thought regarding that? Thanks

    Kevin MichelKevin Michel10 giờ trước
    • Thanks, I will talk more about that in the Model 3 motor videos coming up

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 giờ trước
  • As usual, very informative.

    Horatio WHoratio W11 giờ trước
    • Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 giờ trước
  • Nissan Leaf has 8 bolts, not 6

    CowLevelCryptoCowLevelCrypto14 giờ trước
    • Yes, thanks. I got that wrong

      WeberAutoWeberAuto14 giờ trước
  • I'm sitting here trying to think of an alternate use for one of these motors... It's definitely possible to use it for something but it's not like a small block chevy engine where you can turn it into a blender if you really want. It's gonna take a lot more effort to make use of one of these. Pretty much once you remove the Tesla motor from a Tesla vehicle it's a brick. It's a damn shame as far as I'm concerned. I'd like to see more modular EVs. I dream of some day seeing a Tesla powered motorcycle (like a Boss Hoss but built out of a Model S Plaid or something).

    Ivan FIvan F16 giờ trước
    • There are ways to use Tesla motors in other vehicles. Thanks for your feedback

      WeberAutoWeberAuto14 giờ trước
  • Just an FYI: Nissan Leaf has 8 bolts on the Ring Gear, instead of 6.

    PoppiePoppie18 giờ trước
    • Yes, thanks. I got that wrong

      WeberAutoWeberAuto18 giờ trước
  • And shat is an Igbo?

    Robert RiquelmyRobert Riquelmy19 giờ trước
    • @Robert Riquelmy If you meant IGBT, Insulated-Gate Bi-Polar Transistor (IGBT). They are the transistors that control the current through the three stator windings. Sorry for not explaining that.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto18 giờ trước
    • @WeberAuto what is an Igbo?

      Robert RiquelmyRobert Riquelmy18 giờ trước
    • I don’t understand

      WeberAutoWeberAuto18 giờ trước
  • very interesting video , but I'd still rather push my gas guzzler before I'd even think about driving an electric 'car'

    aussieaeromodeleraussieaeromodeler21 giờ trước
    • Thanks, they are not for everyone.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto18 giờ trước
  • Incredible Tesla engineering. And amazing video -- you got the knacks for explaining & teaching.

    Nagaraja BhatNagaraja Bhat21 giờ trước
    • Thank you kindly!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto18 giờ trước
  • Excellent 👍

    Robert HarveyRobert Harvey21 giờ trước
    • Many thanks

      WeberAutoWeberAuto21 giờ trước
  • Thank you for taking time to share this, saves me taking one apart lol

    superclarkeysuperclarkey21 giờ trước
    • LOL, Glad to help!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto21 giờ trước
  • great job! thanks a lot

    Amir ZiaAmir Zia22 giờ trước
    • Thank you!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto22 giờ trước
  • Are you going to take apart the rotor to see what it's made out of and how?

    Air DadAir Dad23 giờ trước
    • Not unless I can get another one. It has 74 copper bars and shorting rings cast in iron laminations. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto23 giờ trước
  • @39:22 that is a pin-fin cold plate heat exchanger. Industry standard HE for liquid cooled power electronics. However this one is quite dense, guessing it's cuz of high current rating of this inverter. Excellent video and thanks for this deep dive :-)

    A. AkramA. Akram23 giờ trước
    • @WeberAuto awesome! Can't wait! Thanks alot :)

      A. AkramA. Akram22 giờ trước
    • @A. Akram Exact? No, but I will be showing it in another video soon

      WeberAutoWeberAuto22 giờ trước
    • @WeberAuto hi prof. Weber. Any idea what is the EXACT geometrical/ electrical/ cooling differences ( if any) between the performance and non performance primary induction motor/inverter/gearbox in the "pre Raven" model S vehicles?

      A. AkramA. Akram23 giờ trước
    • Thanks for the info!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto23 giờ trước
  • @6:18 looks like 8 bolts to me

    Paul1958RPaul1958RNgày trước
    • Yes, I was wrong. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto23 giờ trước
  • when it comes to performance size does matter, and so do the bearing ball......I'm dying here John.. I love you channel keep up the great work.

    Steven l Mendez IISteven l Mendez IINgày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Thanks for the info!

    Gacheru MburuGacheru MburuNgày trước
    • My pleasure

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Great information.

    Mohan SivasankaranMohan SivasankaranNgày trước
    • Glad you think so!

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Superb videos. Clear informative and interesting. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

    Production DesignProduction DesignNgày trước
    • My pleasure!

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Good explanation,very knowledgeable.

    Donald JacksonDonald JacksonNgày trước
    • So nice of you

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Excelente vídeo, muito bom!

    lpletschlpletschNgày trước
    • Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Cool, I want to see all the Tesla breakdowns now

    SpellitlikeitsoundsSpellitlikeitsoundsNgày trước
    • Coming soon! Thanks

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • Dear Prof Kelly, nice video. Thanks for the detailed and well explained content about the tesla drivetrain. At 22:00 you say it's a 60 slot stator. Therefore it means on a three phase motor, it has 20 slots per phase, spreaded on the whole circumference. On these 20 slots, you can realize 4 poles or 2 pole pairs with so called integer slot windings or 8 poles and 4 pole pairs with fractional slot windings. This scheme is repeated for 5 times. On www.emetor.com/windings/ you can type in: Number of poles - 4 or 8 Number of slots - 60 Click on "Update". Then click on e.g the cell 60/4 to see the different winding layouts. ------ The rotor does not make the poles on an asynchronous machine. It's given by the stator. That's the reason that you can use a zylinder, tube or a coke can as a rotor ;-) At 18000 rpm, it's 300 Hz mechanical frequency and 600 Hz electrical frequency on the motor with 2 pole pairs

    Lernen mit RobinLernen mit RobinNgày trước
    • Thank you very much! I’ll check it out.

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • my guess would be that nissan got their stressing calculations right and the other two put lots of unnecessary metal in there

    mark scullymark scullyNgày trước
    • @mark scully Oh, yes, for sure. Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
    • @WeberAuto what I was saying is it looks like the tesla ring gear and bearings can handle far more torque than their diff would?

      mark scullymark scullyNgày trước
    • I am sure Nissan got their stressing calculations correct too. The Tesla just has a lot more torque than the Nissan. The comparison was to show the huge difference in torque handling capabilities. The leaf is a great car for the purpose it was designed; a commuter car, not a performance car.

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • the huge bearings and ring gear seem excessive especially given the fact that the differential units are more or less the same size in all three units

    mark scullymark scullyNgày trước
    • The ring gear width and diameter combine to handle the torque delivered to it. Although the ring gear diameters are close to the same, their widths are not the same. The larger bearings are necessary for the higher torque delivered.

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • I am pretty sure, that the small cables from the motor stator are winding temperature sensors. Also if you have any questions regarding electric motor winding design, please let me know, I work as an electric motor designer.

    MrZauberwuerfelMrZauberwuerfelNgày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • It's ludacris!

    DRIF L00NDRIF L00NNgày trước
    • LOL, yes

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • He should reach out to Rich rebuilds, he has all kinds of parts that the school could use and Im pretty sure Rich wont charge an arm and a leg, hell he might hook the school up being that its for educational purposes..

    J MJ MNgày trước
    • Thanks for your suggestion

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
  • viworld.info/rock/video/qJ-izGKwpZiJt4U.html

    john flowerjohn flower2 ngày trước
  • Another superb video John. I’m guessing that those dry running motor bearings must cost a fortune otherwise they would be more widely used.

    AnalogueGroundAnalogueGround2 ngày trước
    • @ponemark PI Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
    • @WeberAuto I was looking at them a few years ago for my Gsxr1000 wheels they were around £200 each couldnt justify the cost. Expect the bigger size would be a lot more. Great videos and excellent comunication the professor makes it easy to follow.

      ponemark PIponemark PINgày trước
    • I suspect the same thing. I wish I knew their cost

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • This is just the best!

    TRY to HELP youTRY to HELP you2 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • Amazing video. Interesting to see cylindrical bearings and ball bearings on different gears.

    Eugene PutinEugene Putin2 ngày trước
    • Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • The oil pump channel doesn't seem to go to the silicon nitride bearing. It goes to the 2 bearings on the differential (last shaft on the drive unit). The silicon nitride bearing facing the drive train side seems like its on the rotor side of the circlip in the housing? If my understanding is correct, then the 2 silicon nitride bearings are only cooled by the circulating coolant down the middle of the stator. Am I misundertanding what I see?

    Howard CHoward C2 ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto btw, Model 3 uses a perm magnet rotor design and simplified cooling architecture significantly... Like all other EVs :) viworld.info/rock/video/0I6ayGqqmZurtI0.html&ab_channel=AllEVCanada

      Howard CHoward CNgày trước
    • I don’t know, I am fairly new to the Tesla world. Any clunk on another vehicle is usually related to mounting issues or excessive gear tooth backlash. I suspect mounting problems if yours has been replaced twice. Maybe some loose bolts? The milling noise could be the rotor rubbing on the stator or a bearing on a gear shaft starting to go bad. I wish I knew more. Now that Tesla seems to be surviving, I am willing to invest time in learning more about their products.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto cool thx for the confirmation and great explanation btw. Interesting we don't hear about any coolant leaking into the oil chamber given the complex routing+seal. I guess seals don't face super hot temps in ICE. Any guesses on what caused the 2 common noise issues on early DUs? 1) clunk when torque on/off (parking lot) and 2) the "milling" noise. My 13 MS85 is on its 3rd DU (first 2 swapped due to issue #1/#2) and dealing with the 30mph+ hum/droning noise now.

      Howard CHoward C2 ngày trước
    • You are correct, the Silicon Nitride bearings on the rotor are sealed and have their own internal lubrication. The rotor coolant passage is all that cools those bearings through a solid rotor shaft. The oil pump channel feeds the two bearings on the motor shaft that spins the same speed as the rotor. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • Thank you so much for such an interesting video and explanation!

    Michael LMichael L2 ngày trước
    • You're very welcome!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • I bet the big bearings are not necessarily for torque. Shock load seems to be more of a concern. Everything is hard splined and the rotor is a flywheel with (I*RPM^2) potentially 9+ times the kinetic energy as an ICE.

    Guns Cars and DigitsGuns Cars and Digits2 ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto It's also a 10" ring gear, so in order to make 4500 foot pounds on a 5" radius, it's more like 10,500lb of radial force. Thank you for filming these. It's amazing to see this change happen. Let's see what happens in 10 years. I'm excited to see GM's hummer taken apart. I doubt that vehicle will have everything hard-splined together.

      Guns Cars and DigitsGuns Cars and Digits2 ngày trước
    • The gear reduction of 9.7344:1 also multiplies torque. The 469 ft-lbf or torque gets multiplied by 9.7344 by time it gets to the differential case (minus frictional losses) and delivers 4565 ft-lbf of torque to the tires. Those big bearings are needed for that, although the shock factor is comparable. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • It was Great, Thanks

    علی اسدالهیعلی اسدالهی2 ngày trước
    • Glad you liked it!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • As always, truly outstanding detail. I really appreciate these videos. Thank you.

    Tim SpearsTim Spears2 ngày trước
    • My pleasure!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • I find it amusing that the motor and housing gets hot enough that the coolant used to extract the heat is then used to heat air for the rear of the cabin.

    That JeffThat Jeff2 ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto ah well. Would have been nice to dump the excess heat somewhere, even if it was a minimal amount.

      That JeffThat Jeff2 ngày trước
    • As it turns out, no coolant is used to heat the passenger compartment. I was wrong to suggest that. There is only an electric positive temperature coefficient (PTC) heater. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto2 ngày trước
  • great job John thanks so much

    Mark FerraroMark Ferraro3 ngày trước
    • Glad you enjoyed it

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • I didn’t see the table at first and thought the disassembly was huge!

    K BK B3 ngày trước
    • Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Dear Professor, when this 3 phase motor has a 4- Poles with 60 segments (slots) that leads to: - Each phase has 10 coils (5 coils opposite the other 5), totally 30 coils for the 3 phases. - Pole step = 15 - Distance between the beginning of a phase to another phase = 10 solts, i.e. Winding step = 1 to 12 for each coil - No.of slots for each phase for each pole = 5 - Angel of the slot = 12 degree Those the basic winding info. for the centric winding method, there is a wave (non centric or a Basket) winding, differ for shifting the winding step. With my pleasure.

    Rafid FaizRafid Faiz3 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Understanding the high performance teaching skills of the big Professor is a video I'd like to see! Another bloody good video Prof.

    William StewartWilliam Stewart3 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Landslide victory of the electric motors, Thank you Professor !

    Rafid FaizRafid Faiz3 ngày trước
    • Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Silicon Nitride is indeed a relatively common industrial ceramic, they don't make plates out of it. I'm curious why you'd think otherwise.

    anonymic79anonymic793 ngày trước
    • I was wrong

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Excellent video. I think those “buttons” on the IGBT heat sinks are designed to avoid air bubbles forming on the heat sink, air bubbles would form an insulating layer between the heat sink and coolant. A similar technique is (was) used in cooling high power vacuum tubes and klystrons in broadcast transmitters.

    G8YTZG8YTZ3 ngày trước
    • Very interesting! Thanks for the information

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • My fascination with Tesla engineering started with the Sandy Munro/Autoline after dark piece. That’s why I now understand why the ICE we last had was the last we shall ever have. The electro/mechanical engineering is amazing. The heat scavenging is fundamental to the Tesla efficiency advantage.......the latest octovalve is a phenomenal piece of brilliant design.

    david pearndavid pearn3 ngày trước
    • Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • 11 people salty that just 180lbs of metal can push out 500 lb-ft to the wheels.

    tachikaze222tachikaze2223 ngày trước
    • 500 lb-ft is just the motor torque. You must multiply it by the overall gear ratio to obtain the torque at the wheels (minus frictional losses). 500 x 9.7344 = 4867.2 lb-ft of torque at the wheels.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Really fantastic explanation. If was going back to school for mech or auto engineering I know where I would like to go.

    SiliconValleySkySiliconValleySky3 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • HEY PROF Y WONT THEY PUT A GENERATOR OR ALTERNATOR ON THESE CARS ?

    mike pruettmike pruett3 ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto not talking about that the whole system to be charged with all the talk on not using the grid

      mike pruettmike pruett3 ngày trước
    • They don't need one, the DC-DC converter keeps the 12V battery charged.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • (y) nice, thanks.

    Stephan van IngenStephan van Ingen3 ngày trước
    • Thank you too!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Keep up the good work!

    Jarno TyniJarno Tyni3 ngày trước
    • Thanks, will do!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Awesome

    Bentley McEntireBentley McEntire3 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • I wish electric motors had the personality and warmth of the ICE. We are really losing something in the transition, like going from a 1961 Les Paul to a Guitar Hero controller.

    Taylor CTaylor C4 ngày trước
    • @Julia Hello I don't think so because ICE is engaging on so many more levels, most notably exhaust note and manual transmissions. It is like playing an instrument versus pressing play.

      Taylor CTaylor C3 ngày trước
    • A lot of that is in your mind, not the car. It’s like people always think music was better from when they were teens. Kids born today will not think that ICE cars are warm.

      Julia HelloJulia Hello3 ngày trước
    • Agreed, thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • These videos are of no use to me whatsoever, but they are fascinating. I look forward to them. Thank you.

    Andrew JonesAndrew Jones4 ngày trước
    • LOL! Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Id love to know more about that motor To my experience a 300hp motor would need a crane to lift, this one weigh mere 27kgs

    fredrick Rarifredrick Rari4 ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto You can do 310HP with 19.9Kg. IIRC there is also a few other motors with around the same power to weight. Some or quite torquey to set up, some 400hp and about 70lbs - now I'm trying to remember the name

      Nerium OleanderNerium OleanderNgày trước
    • It is an amazing motor. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto3 ngày trước
  • Tesla Service Manual: "Rear drive unit (small and large): DEXRON VI (DEXRON 6) automatic transmission fluid"

    ranxerox10ranxerox104 ngày trước
    • @ranxerox10 Good to know, thank you!

      WeberAutoWeberAutoNgày trước
    • @WeberAuto Thanks for the Videos, they are always a highlight for me.

      ranxerox10ranxerox10Ngày trước
    • @WeberAuto early Model S Front Drive units need thicker oil (Mobil SHC 629) , later DU use Dexron VI

      ranxerox10ranxerox10Ngày trước
    • Yes, I was wrong about that. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Great video, clearly explaining how the motor works. Thank you very much for an enjoyable 46 minutes.

    Joe BondJoe Bond4 ngày trước
    • Glad you enjoyed it

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • I can't wait to see your Model 3 powertrain videos!

    oisiaaoisiaa4 ngày trước
    • Coming soon!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • I cannot believe the low number of views! Many people are itching to buy an EV right now! Don't they want to know what the technical issues are??? This series on EV internals is an absolute EYE OPENER! I have a technical background but even if you don't this series is a MUST SEE for anyone interested in automobiles and there are gazillion people that have TINKERED with autos!

    konastephkonasteph4 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Fantastic explanation of the dimensions and figures that go into the design! Tesla design team KNEW that drivers would use the acceleration capabilities of the electric drive to the ABSOLUTE MAX which is nothing but ADVERTISEMENT for Tesla and may very well be the reason for people to BUY TESLA .... So failure of components was not an OPTION. BEEFY! Well done docu!

    konastephkonasteph4 ngày trước
    • Well said! Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • 6:18 8 bolts

    Daniel BassDaniel Bass4 ngày trước
    • Yes, I was wrong. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • doing papa elon's job

    bArda26bArda264 ngày trước
    • Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • That rotor cooling is brilliant, and likely the key to such high power density on these units. Although I wonder what kind of seal can withstand 18k RPM!?

    DavidDavid4 ngày trước
    • I wondered the same thing. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Ase master technician with a 2 year degree in electronics . Great video . Probably better training than Tesla gives to their dealer techs . I was wondering how fast the rotor actually spins on those drive units .Question answered .

    Randy WilliamsRandy Williams4 ngày trước
    • Wow, thanks

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Thank you Professor Kelly for the insight of the rear motor can’t wait for the front to see the difference

    Donald SmithDonald Smith4 ngày trước
    • Coming soon, thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Professor I am not a mechanical engineer so question might be stupid one why the design has three set of reduction gears instead of having of two one on motor shaft with 8 teeth which drives the outer gear of 80 teeth - won’t that reduce weight, friction as well as costs

    Alex KumarAlex Kumar4 ngày trước
    • There are many reasons. Each gear tooth has to handle ALL of the torque delivered to it each revolution of the motor shaft. The gear teeth would need to be very large to handle the torque. Having only 8 teeth would load each tooth for each 45 degrees of rotation. That is a large load for a long duration. More gear teeth, like the 25 used on this motor shaft only loads each tooth for 14.4 degrees of rotation. Another reason is the diameter of the gear with 80 teeth would be very large because its gear teeth would also have to be very large in order to mesh with the motor drive gear teeth. So making a compact size gear box is accomplished with multiple reduction gears.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • So interesting about the cooling jets and how they operate to keep it all together. I had no idea. Wow. Thanks professor!

    Jenny NguyenJenny Nguyen4 ngày trước
    • You are welcome! Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Thats approaching Gas Turbine speeds

    Nomad ChadNomad Chad4 ngày trước
    • Interesting information. Thanks

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
    • Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
    • This Motor could power a helicopter, The good old JetRanger or Longranger have 420HP Rolls RoyceTurbines. The twin engine Eurocopter Twinstar has two of the same engines. The output speed of the turbines are 6000RPM so its would just need a single stage reduction or maybe even direct drive depending where the motor is most efficient .

      Nomad ChadNomad Chad4 ngày trước
  • Excellent review...I just subscribed to site. I have a 2015 Model S 70 D, which I have had it up to 113 mph...crazy

    Ed AndersonEd Anderson4 ngày trước
    • Thanks for the sub! Your motor is spinning at 12,821 RPM at 113 mph

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • I recall Porsche had trouble with ball bearings on their crankshafts. Do Tesla owners have good access to mechanics to change oil and coolant at the specified intervals? It worries me that you had trouble finding out the what the recommended fluids were.

    HUT8_NewZealandHUT8_NewZealand4 ngày trước
    • Yes, Tesla owners have access to Tesla Service centers. I was no looking in the right location for the fluid types. It does use Dexron 6 in this read drive unit. I was wrong about that. I am hoping that videos like this can help remove some of the mystery of these vehicles and persuade other repair shops to offer service work on vehicles that are out of warranty.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Awesome show John! Pity Sandy Munro had no time to say hello to you.

    PrivatePrivate4 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • 6:18- One small thing, if I may- The Leaf has 8 bolts holding the ring gear on, not 6 as was stated. This is an excellent video, and Im really enjoying it

    kickinbackinOCkickinbackinOC4 ngày trước
    • Thank you, yes I was wrong about that. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • thanks a lot for impressive video. But I just wonder cooling sequence. Cool inverter first and then motor seems to be efficient. The directions of water flow maybe opposite in your explanation?

    inopy vfrinopy vfr4 ngày trước
    • I thought the same thing at first, but I verified it with Tesla service information and the direction arrow on the coolant pump under the back seat. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • If this were an 8 hour vid I would be compelled to watch it, over heated brain or not. I used a cooling fluid to maintain brain cell temps, Budweiser.

    Patrick RoherPatrick Roher4 ngày trước
    • LOL! Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Thanks again , John Kelly chocks up one more great video that I am enthused to watch several times over . reading all the comments I have nothing more than what has already been said

    william pankratzwilliam pankratz4 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • 250 km/h is completely legal on freeways ("Autobahnen") in Germany (absent some speed limit sign). Thus, we are not talking just track circuits here.

    Gregor GlawitschGregor Glawitsch4 ngày trước
    • That is amazing! Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • This video is gold, your breakdown was outstanding. I work in the greensand casting industry which will be hard hit with EV’s. This really gave me an opportunity to see what if any iron castings are left, I counted one, differential carrier. Your students are getting quite the education, thanks for the tear down!

    GarretDGarretD4 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
    • I’m not sure if the ring gear, reduction gear, spider gears are sand cast as well or not, hard to tell.

      GarretDGarretD4 ngày trước
  • A thank you for your amazing videos also amazing is the welds on this housing at 36:05 WOW!

    John MerlinoJohn Merlino4 ngày trước
    • You are very welcome

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Yet another "Gem" from Weber college; through one of THE greatest professors (John Kelly) on this planet; I do believe. For I can truly say without hesitation that of all the teachers, professors and instructors throughout my life (turn 89 on April 5th); that John is THE greatest. He is a blessing for sure. Thank you kind Sir. Again, If one can't learn under John, they simply can NOT learn, period IMHO.

    pat deepat dee4 ngày trước
    • Thank you very much! Best wishes

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Professor, NICE JOB! Your reverse engineering skills are nearly as good as the #%*&?# Chinese!

    Willy WilkinsWilly Wilkins4 ngày trước
    • Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Very clear explanation both practicly as by spoken words, thanks sir!

    WouterB76WouterB764 ngày trước
    • So nice of you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • The algorithm gods are smiling upon you, I have no idea why I was recommended this. Nonetheless, informative video. Elon is still a doofus though.

    Evan DevriesEvan Devries4 ngày trước
    • LOL, thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Tesla's gear train looks like it was built to last.

    CoyoteCoyote4 ngày trước
    • Agreed!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • looking at the coolant pipe installed on inverter side gear case. that line would be a coolant drain line to remove any air in the system , and aid in coolant flow.

    John RodneyJohn Rodney5 ngày trước
    • Yes it would. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto4 ngày trước
  • Imagine in a parallel universe where we’d been driving electric cars for the last 130 years, and someone tried to explain a new internal combustion engine with all it’s moving parts and cooling/lubrication systems it would be laughed out of existance.

    Gary FishmanGary Fishman5 ngày trước
    • @Guns Cars and Digits wat u mean

      Mr. BeffuMr. Beffu14 giờ trước
    • @Wes Mon I think it can also be argued that we would have had mass EVs a lot sooner if not for ICE.

      Peter KittsPeter KittsNgày trước
    • At the end of the day, the ICE is a 100+% duty cycle device, where the electric assembly is not. Different devices. Different mindsets. Different constraints.

      Guns Cars and DigitsGuns Cars and Digits2 ngày trước
    • and comparing the weight..of a big block chevy engine.. 575 pounds!...

      Ken BatesKen Bates3 ngày trước
    • The internal combustion engine is a huge reason why you have such a comfortable life today. There could not have been electric vehicles en masse before ICE.

      Wes MonWes Mon3 ngày trước
  • Excellent video. FYI Ceramic bearings have been used in machine tour spindles since 1980. They no run up to 40,000 RPMs and are even larger in diameter.

    Ray FrattoneRay Frattone5 ngày trước
    • Thank you and thanks for the info!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • Thank you Professor! I suggest electronics that are used in Tesla model S (Inverter, Converter,..etc)

    Sajana AbeywardanaSajana Abeywardana5 ngày trước
    • Great suggestion! Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • Pls view inverter components

    допиливаю напильникомдопиливаю напильником5 ngày trước
    • I would like to do that, but these are damages from the fire. Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • Try to find a commercial used combustion engine + transmission capable to generate 503hp with the same weight...........goodluck. :-)

    RVORVO5 ngày trước
    • Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • 250… only at the track? Naah. It‘ll be a day like any other on the Autobahn instead. 😉

    RunoratsuRunoratsu5 ngày trước
    • Thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • Nice job, I appreciate it, thanks a lot keep going 👍

    Omar AlumaryOmar Alumary5 ngày trước
    • Thanks, will do!

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • Silicon nitride is a ceramic

    marcus mussawarmarcus mussawar5 ngày trước
    • ps I enjoyed this video, thanks

      marcus mussawarmarcus mussawar5 ngày trước
    • please see the links above where they describe their hybrid bearings as hybrid 'ceramic' ball bearings

      marcus mussawarmarcus mussawar5 ngày trước
    • Correction: I was wrong. Silicon Nitride is a ceramic material.

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • Great video! Not into electric cars but this was very interesting. Subscribed.

    Kremithefrog1Kremithefrog15 ngày trước
    • Thank you

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
  • 9 Nissan owners disliked the video

    Andy WAndy W5 ngày trước
    • lol, thanks for watching

      WeberAutoWeberAuto5 ngày trước
VIworld